JAL’s international traffic down 30% in 2010 v 2007; ANA’s up 7%; 17% of Finnair’s network ASKs on Japanese routes

Despite the airline’s ongoing cutbacks, JAL is still the leading carrier on international routes to and from Japan. However, ANA is closing the gap, thanks in part to the introduction of a new service between Tokyo Narita and Manila, which won our Route of the Week award earlier this year.

Despite the airline’s ongoing cutbacks, JAL is still the leading carrier on international routes to and from Japan. However, ANA is closing the gap, thanks in part to the introduction of a new service between Tokyo Narita and Manila, which won our Route of the Week award earlier this year.

Latest traffic data from Japan’s two dominant carriers (ANA and JAL) and the Japanese Ministry for Land, Infrastructure, Tourism and Transport shows that in 2010 domestic traffic remained virtually unchanged compared with 2009, but that international passengers transported on Japanese airlines was down around 5%. The recent tragic earthquake and concerns about health and safety after the incidents at the Fukushima nuclear facility will have had a significant impact on air traffic levels both domestically and internationally.

Source: ANA, JAL, MLIT

Source: ANA, JAL, MLIT

In January, the latest month for which both ANA and JAL have reported traffic data, domestic traffic was down around 5%, while international traffic was down around 15%, a slight improvement on the almost 20% reductions reported in November and December.

JAL still #1 for international services but ANA gaining fast

Despite its network cutbacks resulting in a falling share of the international market, JAL remains the leading carrier on international routes to and from Japan.

Source: OAG Max Online for w/c 4 April 2011

Source: OAG Max Online for w/c 4 April 2011

In January 2010 JAL transported 824,875 international passengers, just over twice as many as ANA (410,377). A year later JAL carried just 609,000 international passengers (down 26%) while ANA carried 434,000 (up almost 6%).

Maybe surprisingly, the two Japanese carriers have just 25% of total scheduled seat capacity on international services to and from Japan. US carriers led by Delta have almost 17% of international seat capacity.

The leading European airline is Lufthansa, which operates four daily flights spread across two German airports (Frankfurt and Munich) and three Japanese airports (Nagoya, Osaka, Tokyo Narita). Air France has three-daily flights from Paris CDG (two to Tokyo and one to Osaka Kansai) while Finnair also has three daily flights from Helsinki, one each to Nagoya, Osaka and Tokyo. Analysis of schedule data reveals that in terms of ASKs (available seat kilometres) around 17% of Finnair’s entire network ASKs are allocated to its three Japanese routes.


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