germanwings operating 17 non-stop routes from Berlin this summer including Maastricht; 11 routes dropped since 2005

March this year: Berlin Airports CEO Rainer Schwarz (centre) looks happy to avoid paying the €8 German aviation taxes at the Dutch end of the new Berlin-Maastricht route which clearly aims at a German domestic catchment just over the border (the airport shares its name with the German city of Aachen). Schwarz celebrates here with Thomas Winkelmann, CEO germanwings; and Sander Heijmans, CEO Maastricht Aachen Airport. (Photo: Berlin Airports/Christian Kruppa)

March this year: Berlin Airports' CEO Rainer Schwarz (centre) looks happy to avoid paying the €8 German aviation taxes at the Dutch end of the new Berlin-Maastricht route, which clearly aims at a German domestic catchment just over the border (the airport shares its name with the German city of Aachen). Schwarz celebrates here with Thomas Winkelmann, CEO germanwings; and Sander Heijmans, CEO Maastricht Aachen Airport. (Photo: Berlin Airports/Christian Kruppa)

Berlin Schönefeld (SXF) became germanwings’ third German base in June 2005 (after Cologne/Bonn in October 2002 and Stuttgart in September 2003) when it launched 10 routes from the airport, four domestic and six international. Since then, only two of the original routes have been dropped (Ankara and Düsseldorf), while a further 18 destinations have been tried, in some cases just for a single season. This summer, germanwings is offering non-stop flights to 17 destinations from SXF, the same number it was offering back in the summer of 2007.

Source: anna.aero European LCC history database

Source: anna.aero European LCC history database

Apart from Ankara and Düsseldorf, nine other routes have not stood the test of time and are no longer operated by germanwings from Berlin. These are Balaton (Hungary), Bourgas (Bulgaria), Ibiza (Spain), Kavala (Greece), Mykonos (Greece), Oslo (Norway), St Petersburg (Russia), Varna (Bulgaria) and Zweibrücken (Germany). With the exception of Zweibrücken, which was served double-daily between September 2006 and October 2010, the other eight routes were all served with no more than three weekly flights.

The three remaining domestic routes to Cologne/Bonn, Stuttgart and Munich still account for 60% of the airline’s flights from the airport.

The Maastricht experiment

The only new route started since weekly flights to Bastia, Dubrovnik, Pristina, Pula and Zadar were introduced in the summer of 2009 is a twice-daily service to Maastricht in the Netherlands, which began this summer season. Relatively close to the German border, but spared the €8 German government imposed ‘eco-tax’, germanwings has used the axing of the Zweibrücken route to try this market. The only other international routes which come close to being served daily year-round are Stockholm Arlanda and Moscow Vnukovo. Although the airline’s three German routes account for 60% of flights, the country with the most destinations is Croatia, with five.

Country Destination (weekly frequency)
Croatia Dubrovnik (1), Split (5), Pula (2), Zadar (2), Zagreb (3)
France Bastia (2)
Germany Cologne/Bonn (34), Stuttgart (17), Munich (22)
Greece Heraklion (1)
Kosovo Pristina (1)
Netherlands Maastricht (12)
Romania Bucharest Baneasa (2)
Russia Moscow Vnukovo (5)
Sweden Stockholm Arlanda (6)
Turkey Istanbul Sabiha Gökçen (4), Izmir (3)
Source: OAG Max Online for w/c 1 August 2011
Limited overlap with easyJet: The biggest airline at Berlin Schönefeld is easyJet which operates around twice as many flights as germanwings to a network of 33 destinations this summer. The only destinations on which the two airlines compete head-to-head are Dubrovnik, Heraklion and Split. (OK, we know the "Bearbus" left the germanwings fleet in January 2011 – please don’t write in.)

Limited overlap with easyJet: The biggest airline at Berlin Schönefeld is easyJet, which operates around twice as many flights as germanwings to a network of 33 destinations this summer. The only destinations on which the two airlines compete head-to-head are Dubrovnik, Heraklion and Split. (OK, we know the "Bearbus" left the germanwings fleet in January 2011 – please don’t write in.)


New route? New airline? Email us! Let’s all celebrate your new routes. Contact us with photos and route details, and follow us on Instagram for our exclusive daily digest.

Comments

  1. andreas w. schulz says:

    Germanwings gets closer to parent Lufthansa in all matters of distribution. Also LH is keen that its LCC is not eating its own network. If that happens, like in Hamburg, germanwings has been told to leave the ground. So LH has the final command about the do´s and dont´s, no matter how independent germanwings claims to be…

Comments are closed