New airline route announcements and fascinating facts and figures we came across this week (2016 – week 3)

On 16 December, Ethiopian Airlines inaugurated services to Durban from its Addis Ababa hub. South Africa’s biggest eight airports increased their combined traffic by 7.0% to 37.67 million, including 6.5% annual growth at Durban.

On 16 December, Ethiopian Airlines inaugurated services to Durban from its Addis Ababa hub. South Africa’s biggest eight airports increased their combined traffic by 7.0% to 37.67 million, including 6.5% annual growth at Durban.

  • Greece: The country’s airports handled almost 49.2 million passengers last year, an increase of 10.3% on the figure for 2014. Athens, with demand growth of 19%, processed just over 18 million passengers. Growth across all other Greek airports was a more modest 4.4%.
  • Johannesburg’s annual traffic fell just short of 20 million in 2015, coming in at 19,968,413 for the 12 month period. South Africa’s biggest airport grew by 4.9% year-on-year, with the nation’s largest eight facilities increasing their combined traffic by 7.0% to 37.67 million. With 17% annual growth, and now the nation’s fifth largest airport, George in Western Cape Province delivered the most significant yearly increase.
  • Morocco’s nine biggest airports – Agadir, Casablanca, Fez, Laayoune, Marrakech, Nador, Oujda, Rabat and Tangier ‒ have passed 17 million passengers in 2015 (17.23 million to be exact), representing a 1.6% increase over 2014 figures. Casablanca, led the way with 8.18 million annual passengers – a 2.6% rise over the previous 12 months. Laayoune, the largest city in Western Sahara, with an impressive 23% increase in annual traffic, was the fastest growing of the nine airports. Even-faster growing Dakhla Airport, which rose by 32% to nearly 128,000 passengers in 2015, will now be added to anna.aero’s Rest of the World traffic database from January 2016 onwards.
  • Moscow Sheremetyevo has won the battle of the Russian capital – in terms of airport passenger throughput at least. Sheremetyevo handled over 31.61 million passengers in 2015, exceeding not only its own 2014 results, but also the annual traffic of rival airport Moscow Domodedovo, which had been the busiest Russian airport since 2005. Regular readers of anna.aero will have noted that our data elves had spotted the likelihood of this happening last November, when we reviewed Sheremetyevo’s operations. The airport’s domestic traffic in 2015 increased by 5.6% when compared to the same period last year to reach 13.82 million passengers. The number of passengers on international routes reached 17.80 million, down slightly by 3.7% when compared to 2014 results.
On 24 December, t’way air launched its first service to Vietnam, with the introduction of daily flights between Seoul Incheon and Ho Chi Minh City using its 737-800s. Driven by regional services like this one, South Korea’s largest 13 airports grew by 11% year-on-year, adding nearly 12 million annual passengers during 2015.

On 24 December, t’way air launched its first service to Vietnam, with the introduction of daily flights between Seoul Incheon and Ho Chi Minh City using its 737-800s. Driven by regional services like this one, South Korea’s largest 13 airports grew by 11% year-on-year, adding nearly 12 million annual passengers during 2015.

  • South Korea has 13 airports which qualify for inclusion in anna.aero’s Rest of the World traffic database – over 100,000 passengers per annum. These airports have grown from just under 107 million in 2014 to nearly 119 million in 2015 – representing an 11% increase. Six of those months – namely April, May, August, October, November and December ‒ saw the 13 airports produce a combined 10 million passengers in each of those months. Seven of the 13 airports also delivered double-digit annual growth – Muan (+75%), Gunsan (+33%), Daegu (+32%), Cheongju (+24%), Ulsan (+23%), Busan (+19%) and Jeju (+13%).

New route? New airline? Email us! Let's all celebrate your new routes. Please send photos and route details to James Davis, anna.aero's Assistant Editor. Contact James.

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